Avoiding Frost Damage In Your Plants And Trees

Winter isn’t the most pleasant time of the year, and most people would prefer to be curled up in a blanket with a hot drink than outdoors. Animals can do the same.

It may not be known, but your plants feel the cold too. Unlike us, they can’t just walk inside and crank the heater up. They’re stuck, left to feel the chill of the wind and rain. So, how can you tell that your plants are being badly affected by winter weather?

There are a multitude of signs that point towards damaged or brittle plants, and luckily, a range of solutions to ensure that your investment is stable.

What is Frost Burn?

As the name suggests, this looks like the outer areas of the trees have been burnt. If the foliage or stems appear as dried, or brown in colour, they are probably affected by winter burn. It is caused by the cells of the plants freezing and shrinking. Then, as temperatures gradually rise, the foliage will begin a thawing process. If this is slow, the plants tend to become dehydrated which leads to frost burn.

It is also caused by factors such as strong bursts of sunshine amongst frigid winter days.

Minimising the Damage

There are a number of steps you can take to help protect your plants again frost damage, and ensure that they make it to spring. These include: 

  • Cultivating Susceptible Plants

Plants have climates in which they best thrive, and sometimes, we choose based on looks rather than suitability. It is important to choose plants to include in your garden that are best suited to the environmental elements it will live in. There are certain plants that will be instantly damaged when hitting low temperatures, which is a waste of money for you and a sore spot within you landscape.

  • Opening Air Flow

This may seem like a counterproductive point, but it is important that your trees and shrubbery have a clear air flow. You need to ensure that plants of all heights have a clear pathway to feel air flow, as frost occurs harshly when they do not.

  • Prune Before and After, Not During

Winter pruning should occur just before the season, at the end of autumn. You should avoid the next pruning until after the frost has settled and finished.

  • Overhead Protection

If it is necessary to try and promote heat retention within your plants during winter, you can cover them with protective fabric. This can be done using a material such as hessian. Try to avoid the use of plastic coverings, as it doesn’t necessarily deter frost from forming, and can aid damage when hit by extreme sunlight in colder months.

Ensure that you have the correct plants and trees that will last you through the winter, and thrive within spring. At Watersave Landscaping, we have professional plant selection and protection services which will ensure that we select the right plant for the climate, and leave your garden looking fresh and healthy. To find out more, and get advice regarding solutions for your landscape today, get in touch.

 

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